12th Grade Civics

Week 22/ February 10 to 16, 2020

The Week's Schedule of Work and Activities

 

Monday, February 10, 2020

 

Lincoln’s Birthday / No Classes

 

Tuesday, February 11, 2019 / Regular Schedule

 

Classical Tuesday:  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) / String Quartet No. 6 in B flat

 

A string quartet is a musical ensemble of four string players – two violin players, a viola player and a cellist – or a piece written to be performed by such a group. The string quartet is one of the most prominent chamber ensembles in classical music, with most major composers, from the mid to late 18th century onwards, writing string quartets.   Quartet composition flourished in the Classical era, with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert following Haydn in each writing a number of quartets.  Today's music is one of the six string quartets, composed by Mozart in late 1772 and early 1773. Because they were composed in Milan while he was working on his opera Lucio Silla, they are popularly known as the Milanese Quartets.

 

Reading / Discussion

 

A discussion of the reading of Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, and Rousseau on Government.  Participation points for debate will be given.

 

Homework:

 

Study pages 7 to 10 in your textbook to prepare for a five-question plus bonus quiz on this material tomorrow.  It includes:

 

Is Representative Democracy Best? (pages 7 to 8)

How is Political Power Distributed? (pages 8 to 10)

 

You will not be quizzed on the Can a Democracy Fight a War Against Terrorists? (Sidebar) (page 7).  You may, however, read the material and answer one of the four questions with a good and thoughtful paragraph.   It must be typed and turned in tomorrow unless you are absent.  Then it must be turned in the day you return (no exceptions)

 

Wednesday, February 12, 2019 / Regular Schedule

 

Broadway Musical Wednesdays: West Side Story (1957) / Arthur Laurents (book), Leonard Bernstein (music), Stephen Sondheim (lyrics).

 

The original 1957 Broadway production, directed and choreographed by Jerome Robbins and produced by Robert E. Griffith and Harold Prince, marked Sondheim's Broadway debut. It ran for 732 performances before going on tour. The production was nominated for six Tony Awards including Best Musical in 1957. The story is set in the Upper West Side neighborhood in New York City in the mid-1950s, an ethnic, blue-collar neighborhood. The musical explores the rivalry between the Jets and the Sharks, two teenage street gangs of different ethnic backgrounds. The young protagonist, Tony, a former member of the Jets and best friend of the gang's leader, Riff, falls in love with Maria, the sister of Bernardo, the leader of the Sharks. The dark theme, sophisticated music, extended dance scenes, and focus on social problems marked a turning point in American musical theatre. Bernstein's score for the musical includes "Something's Coming", "Maria", "America", "Somewhere", "Tonight", "Jet Song", "I Feel Pretty", "A Boy Like That", "One Hand, One Heart", "Gee, Officer Krupke", and "Cool".

 

Due Today

 

Optional paragraph from Can a Democracy Fight a War Against Terrorism?

 

Quiz 2

 

Five questions plus a bonus based on the reading from pages 7 to 10 in your textbook. It includes:

 

Is Representative Democracy Best? (pages 7 to 8)

How is Political Power Distributed? (pages 8 to 10)

Can a Democracy Fight a War Against Terrorists? (Sidebar) (page 7)

 

Primary Source Analysis:  Popular Sovereignty and Free Government in The Federalist, Numbers 10, 39, and 51 / Day 1 of 3

 

You’ll be reading excerpts from Federalist No. 39, titled "The conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles", by James Madison, published on January 18, 1788.  In it, Madison defines a republican form of government, and he also considers whether the nation is federal or national: a confederacy, or consolidation of states.

 

This is be followed by Federalist No. 10, also by Madison, published on November 22, 1787. No. 10 addresses the question of how to reconcile citizens with interests contrary to the rights of others or inimical to the interests of the community as a whole. Madison saw factions as inevitable due to the nature of man—that is, as long as men hold differing opinions, have differing amounts of wealth and own differing amount of property, they will continue to form alliances with people who are most similar to them and they will sometimes work against the public interest and infringe upon the rights of others. He thus questions how to guard against those dangers.

 

Finally, Federalist No. 51 by Madison, published on February 8, 1788, entitled "The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments".  It addresses means by which appropriate checks and balances can be created in government and also advocates a separation of powers within the national government. This idea of checks and balances became a crucial document in the establishment of the modern U.S. system of checks and balances. One of its most important ideas, an explanation of check and balances, is the often-quoted phrase, "Ambition must be made to counteract ambition."

 

You will be asked to read and analyze this material in class.  Questions for you to work on and complete will be given you to tomorrow.

 

Homework:

 

Study pages 10 to 14 in your textbook to prepare for a five-question plus bonus quiz on this material tomorrow.  It includes:

 

Is Democracy Driven by Self-Interest? (pages 10 to 11)

What Explains Political Change? (pages 11 to 12)

The Nature of Politics (pages 12 and 14)

 

You will not be quizzed on the What Would You Do section on page 13.  You may, however, read and write a one paragraph reason for your decision to favor or oppose the ban on ballot initiatives for a free quiz bonus point.  It must be typed and turned in tomorrow unless you are absent.  Then it must be turned in the day you return (no exceptions)

 

Thursday, February 13, 2019 / Regular Schedule

 

Opera Thursday:  Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868)  /  The Barber of Seville (1816)

 

An opera buffa in two acts by Gioachino Rossini with an Italian libretto by Cesare Sterbini. The libretto was based on Pierre Beaumarchais's French comedy Le Barbier de Séville (1775).   Rossini's Barber has proven to be one of the greatest masterpieces of comedy within music, and has been described as the opera buffa of all "opere buffe". Even after two hundred years, it remains a popular work.

 

Due Today

 

Optional paragraph from What Would You Do? section on page 13

 

Quiz 3

 

Five questions plus a bonus based on the reading from pages 10 to 14 in your textbook. It includes:

 

Is Democracy Driven by Self-Interest? (pages 10 to 11)

What Explains Political Change? (pages 11 to 12)

The Nature of Politics (pages 12 and 14)

 

Primary Source Analysis:  Popular Sovereignty and Free Government in The Federalist, Numbers 10, 39, and 51 / Day 2 of 3

 

You’ll be given a number of questions to work on in class based on the material you were given yesterday.  These are to be worked on in class in preparation for a discussion tomorrow.

 

Friday, February 14, 2019 / Regular Schedule

 

Whatever Fridays

 

Whatever Fridays are reserved for...well...whatever!  It might be a classic music video, a clip from an old film, something totally weird, or something quite pedestrian and everyday.  You can help program Whatever Fridays by submitting a request at steve.rosenberg@abcusd.us   Mind you, it need to be free of explicit language and be in good taste.  And it has to appeal to SiR's standards.

 

Due Today

 

Finished answers to the questions from The Federalist, Numbers 10, 39, and 51.

 

Primary Source Analysis:  Popular Sovereignty and Free Government in The Federalist, Numbers 10, 39, and 51 / Day 3 of 3

 

The material you worked on yesterday will be collected and redistributed.  There will be discussion and debate based the questions.

 

 

S. Rosenberg  /  Whitney High School  /  16800 Shoemaker Avenue  /  Cerritos, California 90703  /  562-926-5566  x22361  /  steve.rosenberg@abcusd.us